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Do These Photos Tempt You?

This one's all about the love of dessert.

When I was growing up, Mom always made sure that something rich, infused with sugar and fat, was a part of our evening meal.  It wasn't necessarily fancy; cakes and pies were staples; but it was, it seemed, essential. Dinner could never be finished without this indulgence, this treat for our taste buds,  this decadence.

It was all home made with love, and like mother, like daughter, it was a ritual I carried forth when raising my own family. Especially since I love dessert and since I married a former farm boy, who had been as used to a full menu as I. Getting up and leaving the table without a piece of pie, a bowl of fruit cobbler or crisp, or a slab of cake was unheard of.  Through time, cheesecakes and trifles became popular choices as well, with little thought to whether any of it actually offered any value to our diet.

Then came the 1980s, Jane Fonda, the fitness craze and the dawning of a new awareness. It became clear that to live a good long life,  we needed exercise and healthy food. True, we weren't leading the active lifestyles we used to, and fat and sugar, we were apparently surprised to learn, weren't exactly good for us. And so, desserts were pretty much off the table and have stayed off.  Sure, they come out for special occasions and company, but about the only treat for me now to finish a meal is a tiny piece of quality chocolate.

Yes, we all know it's a good idea to avoid desserts. But I believe everybody's entitled to a slice of self-indulgence from time to time. And if you're looking for images to convince people, in menus for restaurants, in flyers for bake sales, in ads for bakeries, these photo collections are perfect. No fruit cups or healthy yogurt here. Just the good stuff — deliciously sweet, horribly fattening, yummy desserts.

iCLIPART.com Dessert Photos

iPHOTOS.com Photos of Desserts

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